Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Fishbowl #8, Chapters 24 and 25 of The Kite Runner

Welcome to your eighth and final fish bowl!

A few reminders if you're looking for an A for the day:

(A) Bring at least one quotation and/or page reference into at least one of your responses.
(B) Explain your thinking thoughtfully and thoroughly (try to avoid the one-sentence response).
(C) Keep it professional, including the usage of proper grammar and spelling.
(D) Comment frequently from the beginning of the conversation to the end.


Remember also that you're welcome to get into a hot seat in the inner circle for a little while and earn some of your daily participation points there.

134 comments:

  1. After reading the book will Assef the leader of the Taliban go find Amir and Sohrab for what Sohrab did to him?

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    1. I dont think that they would go to America to go and find Sohrab because they would get arrested in America

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    2. They can't go past the border to get to America. I don't think they would go through all that trouble to catch them.

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    3. Well since Assef is crazy and hunted down Hassan and killed him so maybe... Also he did get hit in the left eye because of Sohrab.

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    4. I personally believe that Assef has enough hatred to go fine Amir and Sohrab but he wouldnt actually make the effort to go all the way to America just to find him

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    5. I don't think there's anyway they would go though as much trouble as it would take to get to America just to find Sohrab and Amir.

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    6. I dont think he would go to America to get them and risk being arrested

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  2. Why did it take so long for sohrab to respond tom amir asking him to come to america with him.

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    1. He broke a promise he had to him and he wasn't happy. But also he did go and save him.

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    2. He probably was scared of going to somewhere where he's never been and his parents wouldn't be apart of it. He hasn't know Amir for that long and is probably scared of what would happen if he went to America.

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    3. Sohrab felt scared being in a new place so far away from the place he had grown up in. He also felt ashamed for cutting himself. He felt like he had let Amir down.

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    4. Because he wasn't sure if Amir was serious about it and thought they would get tired of him.












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  3. Will Amir ever go back to Afghanistan?

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    1. I think Amir will eventually return to Afghanistan, after all its where he grew up. It will always be his home country and will always have a place in his heart.

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    2. I think he will eventually but it would be hard for him to go back and see how much things have changed since his childhood.

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    3. I don't think he really does want to go back but I think he will end up going back at some point because it is his home town.

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    4. Amir always stressed how Afghanistan is his "home" and his "country". I believe that Amir will eventually open up to the realization that this is still true and he will return.

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    5. I don't think he will go back anytime soon. If he does it will be way later when things have really changed and things are calmed down.

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    6. I think maybe one day when the Taliban has been over thrown, but I don't think that has happened. Also his experience was hard and he went through a lot there, and it is not the Afghanistan he remembered, so I really doubt it.

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    7. I believe that at some point in time Amir will return in order to gain peace of mind. I think that he live with guilt until he returns and simply just try to except what has happened, and that there is nothing he can now do to turn time back.

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    8. I don't think so, because Assef is still there and the Tailban is completely ruining the country. Also, I think he doesn't have a reason to go back anymore because Rahim is dead, Sohrab his with him.

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  4. Does Amir feel redeemed for finding Sohrab?

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    1. Yes, if he felt more connected to his family, but at the same time he doesn't because it will never bring Hassan back from the dead.

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    2. I think that he does because he did a favor for his brother by getting his son out of afghanistan

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    3. Yes and no, he did break his promise to Sohrab. But also he is happy because he found him and can give him a better life.

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    4. I don't think he does just for finding Sohrab, but for also taking him back to America and taking him in as his own.

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    5. I don't think so because I think that Amir knows that no matter what he does to try and redeem himself it's nothing that compares to what he did to Hassan. He is consciously aware that he will have to live with his own guilt with the rest of his life; despite whatever efforts he makes.

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    6. Yes Amir has been thinking all his life how he could redeem himself for what he put Hassan through. One of them is finding Sohrab the other is adopting him. I think Amir feels in his heart that Hassan has finally forgave him.

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    7. I agree with Grace that the answer is yes and no at the same time. I feel like his childhood past will always haunt Amir in someone and that he obviously won't forget it. But he also knows he has done a good deed by finding Sohrab and adopting him/. Hassan will always be a part of his life.

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  5. How did Amir feel after he saved Sorab and brought him back to America?

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  6. "For you a thousand times over" 317 i think this shows how much Amir has grown throughout the book. Now he isn't an owner but a servant to Sohrab.

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    1. Yes I think that this shows that amir is at peace with what happened to hassan

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  7. Pg 302 "And that, I believe, is what true redemption is, Amir jan, when guilt leads to good." Does this mean that Amir has redeemed himself? Is he completely forgiven for what happened to Hassan?

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    1. I think yes because Amir has finally forgiven himself for what happened to Hassan because he rescued Hassan's son and felt the pain that he thought he deserved for how he treated Hassan in the past. But guilt does lead to good because it makes you usually do the right thing in the end.

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  8. The way that Amir can be forgiven for his actions to Hassan is that Sorhab has to see Amir as a role model, hero, and a great leader and father. Now that Amir has adopted Sorhab, I feel that Amir is forgiven by Sorhab, which means that Hassan can forgive him.

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    1. I agree with you. I think that Amir has switched roles. Amir might treat Sohrab the way he wanted to be treated as a child when Baba was his father.

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  9. Did Amir really feel at peace once he had gotten dealt with by Assef because he said it is what he needed to be at piece about the whole Hassan thing?

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    1. Well, the whole situation with Hassan was only punishment for what he felt for himself and to his nephew. At the same time, I would say that he will mentally never feel at peace with his brother since he felt so much grief, guilt, and anger for what he did with Hassan .

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  10. On page 355 Sohrab says "Wish you hadn't... I wish you had left me in the water." Why do you think Sohrab says this? How did Soharbs suicide attempt have an impact on Amir?

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    1. All people who commit suicide want to die. He says this because he would rather die then being in an orphanage.

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    2. he was really hurt because he had said " Don't ever say that Sohrab... i can't bare to hear you talk like that" Amir just wanted to help him and make up for hassan.

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  11. On page 371, when Amir says, "For you, a thousand times over!" what do you think that means. Do you think Amir meant it in the same way Hassan meant it in Chapter 7. Do you think Amir thinks this quote means something good now, and not his betrayal?

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  12. On page 359, Amir says "I wondered if thats how forgiveness budded, not with the fanfare of epiphany, but with pain slipping away unnoticed in the middle of the night." How can this quote explain how Amir feels about forgiveness

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    1. For forgiveness, it's the struggle of letting go of all the negative emotions towards a certain person, but as you let go you feel free and well satisfied with oneself for being the bigger person.

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  13. When Amir says," For you a thousand times over." (pg.371) What is the significance?

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    1. It's the last thing that Hassan said right before the incident in the alley and it showed how much Hassan would do for Amir and when Amir says the same thing to Sohrab I think he is saying that he will sacrifice everything to make Sohrab happy.

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    2. This is significant because it kind of seals the promise that he won't leave him and forsake him. It is also like what Hassan said to him.

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    3. Just like when Hassan told Amir " For you a thousand times over." before he went to get the kite and got raped. Amir is feeling really proud or happy to have Sohrab as his son. The significance for Amir to say this is showing that he is going to treat Sohrab right.

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  14. Why did Sohrab jump to conclusions about the orphanage and decide to slit his wrists? To him did that seem to be the only way out of the orphanage?

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    1. I think he didn't want to go to an orphanage because then Assef could easily find him again and he didn't want to go through that again. And since he is underage. An orphanage is probably the only place he could go.

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    2. Yes, I think that Sohrab ran out of options. He simply gave up on himself and thought death was the only way out (which is obviously not true).

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    3. sohrab wanted to kill himself because he didn't want to be taken by the taliban, and thought that another orphanage would lead to the taliban taking him again.

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  15. Beside the fear of the Taliban taking Sohrab back if he went to the orphanage. Why does Sohrab cut himself right hearing that he might have to go to an orphanage?

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    1. I believe he sought attention, as well as seeking an alternative (possibly death).

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    2. He feels like his life won't be worth anything and that ending it or causing himself pain is the only way to go.

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  16. Why do you think that Sohrab wouldn't talk to Amir after what happend? He doesn't have to go to a orphanage.

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    1. I think he might just be scared because of what happened and he thinks that he will never be the same again.

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    2. I think sohrab was just starting to trust amir, and when amir said it was a possibility he would go to an orphanage, he lost that trust.

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    3. Sohrab is unsure on if he can trust Amir again after Amir promised Sohrab that he would never again go to an orphanage and Amir broke that trust by telling him that it would have to for a short while. Sohrab has been through a lot and just wants to make sure that he can put his faith in Amir again.

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  17. Why do you think that Sohrab doesn't act like he is greatful for what Amir has done for him

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    1. I think that he really is grateful but doesnt act like it because maybe he is mad at him for some reason.

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    2. He's angry for Amir destroying the promise that he made with Sohrab and he's grateful but at the same time he couldn't because of AMir's actions.

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  18. on page 210 Amir wakes up from a nap and Sohrab is gone. how would someone react to something so sudden like that?

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    1. I would think that he would be scared because is is his nefew

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    2. The first reaction would be a panic, but you'd have to calm yourself down and go try find him.

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  19. Was that man right on page 316 when he said " The thing about you Afghanis is that ... well, you people are a little reckless."

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    1. He was right that most of the Afghanis we have heard about can get a little reckless, but it's definitely not all of them

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  20. On page 368 Amir asks Sorab if he wants to fly the kite. How did Amir look back at his life at the end?

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    1. Amir looks back to all of the memories he shared with Hassan and the whole kite competition also what would happen later that evening.

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  21. Was Amir looking for forgiveness from Hassan or forgiveness from himself?

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    1. Forgiveness from himself. I mean Hassan is dead so Hassan really can't forgive him (even know I think he did over time), but more for himself because he knew he should have saved Hassan, but he didn't.

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    2. Both because Amir wanted Hassan to forgive him for his mistakes that he did in the past but also he wants to forgive himself and prove to himself that he is a good person and sometimes people makes mistakes.

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  22. Why would the government need to know if the children's parents died?

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    1. Probably because they want to make sure that they are dead so they can give him the child.



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    2. They want to know because if the parents aren't really dead then your just kidnapping the kid from the parents. They want to know that Sohrab is really an orphan to not have many legal problems.

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    3. If his parents are alive they can't just give him to somebody else.

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  23. Who do you think suffers the most in The Kite Runner? Why?

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  24. Did Baba's actions from the past start to haunt other people in his family?

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  25. In the beginning of chapter 24 Amir says Assef deserved more than he got. What could Amir mean by this?

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    1. I think he means that Assef deserves a much bigger punishment for what he did to Hassan and all of those kids.

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  26. What role do you think religion plays in the whole story?

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    1. On pages 345 and 346, Amir prays for the first time in 15 years, I think Religion is a form of redemption. Also it shows that Amir is making his own decisions from Baba. He believes there is a God and there is a thing called forgiveness and redemption.

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    2. I think religion plays a huge role in the story. The religion of Hassan was so badly looked at that it caused Hassan to get raped and beaten. Religion can affect so much about how you're looked at. That's why it's so lucky in America that we get freedom or religion.

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    3. Religion plays a big part in this novel. When the Taliban take over Afghanistan they make a lot of rules. They think that it is completely fine to kill the Hazara`s because that is what they believe in.

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  27. It seemed as the first deep conversation Sohrab and Amir had was about their parents. Why was this?

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  29. Who do you think the Kite Runner is? Does it change through out the story. How does page 371, change how Amir feels about kite running? Do you think this last page brings back good or bad memories for Amir and Sorab?

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    1. I think The Kite Runner is Hassan and it brings back both good and bad memories. On the same page, when Amir says the iconic line from Hassan in the beginning of this book, you know both he and Sorab remember is and that Hassan has made a big difference in his life and shaped him as a person.

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  30. On page 316 it says " The thing about you Afghans is that well you are a little reckless." After Fayyaz said this to him, How did it make him feel?

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    1. Well he isn't really sure because that's not what h used to think but now with everything that had happened there his mind might have changed.

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  31. on page 371 when amir says " do you want me to run that kite for you?''
    then amir says " for you a thousand times over" do you think he does this to make up for when Hassan ran the kite for him?

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    1. I think so because its like Amir reminisces on his old memories with Hassan.

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  32. Couldn't Amir could've taken Sohrab as a refugee or something?

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    1. That wasn't allowed. Sorab had to go to an orphanage first.

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  33. Do you think that Amir has completed the full "Hero's Journey" and why?

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    1. Yes, I do. Amir received the call, crossed the threshold, faced many challenges, etc. He has completed the full "Hero's Journey".

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  34. Why did Sorab want to kill himself? He had just got adopted from Amir

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    1. He thought he was going to have to go back to an orphanage and he was scared because the last time he was at there they sold him to Assef.

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    2. Yah he thought that amir was gonna send home back to the orphanage

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  35. How is Sohrab going to recover from the sexual abuse he suffered? How would someone react to something like this and would it affect you for the rest of your life?

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    1. I feel like it will definitely affect him in a big way for they res of his life but as he gets older it should start to get better.

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    2. It will take him a long time but with Sorayas and Amirs help I think he can get through it. It is defiantly going to affect him for the rest of his life but I think with his new living situation and being somewhere safer he wont feel scared that it could happen again.

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  36. How does the book and the ending change your views on Afghanistan and how much you like it?

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    1. That is a scary place in a way. An how much diffrent it is here that we would all have a hard time adjusting to it.

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  37. Will Amir ever tell Sohrab the whole truth as to what happened to Hassan? Does Amir feel that he owes Sohrab that?

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    1. I believe that he will because he still feels like he should do what's right with regards to Hassan

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    2. I think it's not so much that he feels like he owes Sorab that, but more that he needs to say it out loud for him to truly move on from that night in the alley.

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    3. Yes but when Sohrab is older and will understand more. He still is a child who has been through a lot and I think that right now it wouldn't be a good time because he doesn't want to see that his father has been through the same pain as him. When he gets older, he will understand.

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  38. On page 319 why is Sohrab ranting about being so full of sin what did he do to be full of sin?

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    1. He may have heard of what happened to his father or some of his actions that can cause sins to himself.

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  39. Do you think Sohrab being silent is significant in anyway? If so, why?

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  40. Do you think that part of Sohrab's cutting was to get attention

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  41. On page 371, do you think that the line "For you a thousand times over" leads to absolution for Amir's sins? Do you think that Amir will see himself as more of a good human being now that he has Sorab?

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  42. Sara asked a good question. What do you think the author wanted kites to represent in this book?

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  43. How was Amir different and smarter at the end of the book compared to the beginning? I think he changed a lot

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  44. What would make Sohrab want to kill himself?

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    1. He didn't want to go back to an orphanage because of what happened to him last time.

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    2. I agree with Hadley. I think that Sohrab just gave up on everything.

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  45. "They would have lost him if his heart hadn't been young and strong." On page 384. What's the deeper significant's to this quote?

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  46. Did Sohrab cut him self in order for Amir to feel guilty so no matter what he wouldn't be put in and orphanage.

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    1. Do you think that the kite's motion represents the conditions between Hassan and Amir, as well as the turbulence in Afghanistan

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    2. I don think so because on pg 355 when he said " I wish you hadn't-" Sohrab wanted to hurt himself because of where he had to go.

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  47. Do the symbols in the book parallel one another? How so? What symbols are necessary and which do you think are overkill?

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  48. Why was the Book named Kite Runner instead of another name that would go with the plot of the book?

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    1. At first I thought it was named because of Hassan and him running the kite and then Amir betraying him. But then at the end of the I think the title meant how much Amir as changed and that now he is running for Hassan and Sorab. And then now that he is forgiven, he is running away from his sins and running towards forgiveness.

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  49. How have the characters honored Hassan after his death?

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  50. Why do you think Amir ran the kite for Sorab? Was he trying to be like Hassan, or was it a symbol? On page 371, what does Amir running symbolize?

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  51. Does the end of the book change your views of Amir? Is Amir a hero afterall? What will you take away from this book? How will you change your life for the better?

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  52. Why did Farid help Amir so much? Was it just for the reward or did he actually want to help?

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  53. Do you think Sorhab will ever been the same?

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  54. What was Amir feeling after Sorab got out of the hospital and wasn't talking? On page 356 it says "Something was lost between Sorab and me." What did that mean?

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  55. "If America taught me anything, it's that quitting is right up there with pissing in the Girl Scouts' lemonade jar." - Omar Faisal, Chapter 24, page 295. This quote explains the drive that Americans have to continue working and improving

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